DSC09364.jpg

Raising awareness.

Providing resources.

Making lives better.

about us

At FTGF we believe that experiences in nature are an important part of caring for one’s mental health…..More about Why we do what we do….Throw in some statistics

A Letter from the Founder:

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

IMG-5951.jpg

Jennings Hester, Founder

michael-aleo-OsdgZG1byTk-unsplash.jpg

Our core values

We believe that those experiencing mental health challenges have the greatest chance of success when they have access to what they need most. That’s where FTGF comes in.

IMG_1004.PNG
IMG_1008.PNG
IMG_1006.PNG
IMG_1005.PNG

Access to professional help

We believe that it’s important for those experiencing mental health challenges to be able to access help from a professional licensed therapist. The foundation of all of our retreats is built on talk therapy or group therapy lead by professionals- it’s what makes us so different from everyone else.

Regular exposure to nature

We’ve all seen the research- spending time in nature and cultivating hobbies that facilitate a relationship with the natural world has long lasting positive effects on mental health.

community 
building

So much of the heart of FTGF comes from our desire to build a supportive community where mental health isn’t a taboo. Whether it’s at a retreat or online in our resource center, we’re here to create an open community where you feel supported and understood.

financial
support

Therapy and mental health services can be expensive. FTGF is working tirelessly to make sure that it’s affordable for those who need it by offering scholarships and subsidies.

“Being able to attend the Fishing the Good Fight retreat was a breath of fresh air for me. The retreat wasn’t just a reset for me, but a reenergizing launching point to connect with other men and nature. Spending time along Tarryall Creek allowed me to notice parts of my inner self that needed to be mended. This time allowed me to work on mending those vulnerable areas alongside new friends and with a professional counselor.”
-Taylor

Our expert team

DSC09215-2.jpg
7982CD20-A42D-4D72-8836-18787E2DDA35.JPG
DSC04078 (2).jpg
DSC04180 (2).jpg
IMG-4912.JPG

Jennings Hester

1 sentence about his ties to fly fishing. 1 sentence about mental health. 1 sentence about role in FTGF.

Neeraj "Raj" Sathe

1 sentence about his ties to fly fishing. 1 sentence about mental health. 1 sentence about role in FTGF.

Baker
arena

1 sentence about his ties to fly fishing. 1 sentence about mental health. 1 sentence about role in FTGF.

jeff
guidotti

1 sentence about his ties to fly fishing. 1 sentence about mental health. 1 sentence about role in FTGF.

joe
deitz

1 sentence about his ties to fly fishing. 1 sentence about mental health. 1 sentence about role in FTGF.

DSC04117 (1).jpg

As men, we’re taught from an early age that “boys don’t cry.” Whether it’s a scraped knee or even the death of a loved one, we are instilled with the notion that to express our feelings is a sign of weakness. Though this stereotype has been slowly breaking down over time, it’s still prevalent in our society.

Stephen Rodgers, Founder of Denver Men's Therapy